Aftermath of flash flooding that tore through Ellicott City, Maryland, on Sunday, just two years after a 2016 flood devastated the town.
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Aftermath Of Flash Flooding That Tore Through Ellicott City, Maryland | TIME

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17 thoughts on “Aftermath Of Flash Flooding That Tore Through Ellicott City, Maryland | TIME

  1. I was watching the weather channel. A thoudsand year flood doesn't mean it will happen every 1,000 years . Technically the measurement is a probability. A 100-year flood means that there is one chance in 100 or one chance in 1,000 of a flood occurring in each year. A 500-year flood means there is 0.2% chance of the flooding or rain event occurring each year and a 1,000-year event has a 0.1% chance of happening in any year.

  2. Nothing wrong here liberal trendies learning to swim. Didnt texas have some weather due to Trump. Hawaii has volcanoes voted hillary California wildfires hillary now this i see a pattern. Quick give al gore money that will turn the tide or better yet celebrities on private jets telling everyone they should be environmentally aware.

  3. Everyone keeps saying this is a 1,000 year flood– it's not. This isn't a "natural" flood… this is a man-made disaster caused by faulty civic engineering of the past few years. Drainage during new construction was done improperly. Look it up. NO flood Ellicott City has ever had in 200 years has been this bad– even with a hurricane involved. This is DESTRUCTION because Frederick Road basically became a river, and it will happen again within a few more years if something isn't done to change the new construction back to what it was before. Remember that this happened in only 45 minutes of heavy rain. The problem is not the rain! Educate yourselves about what Howard County did. No one seems to mention that!

  4. In Italy this happen too. But we study how to prevent this kind of disasters, so just when there are very very violent cases of raining for a long time there is the chance of a flood.
    As a building surveyor I like to watch building and engineering tv shows but I stil can't understand why you build so many cheap houses that get destroyed istantly from tornadoes and then… a flood like that couldn't be prevented… omg, to make a new channel and add safety gates you don't need that much, 200 millions can save your ass and avoid you paying a billion later (plus lives). I know this estimation sucks, but prevention is way cheaper than damages.
    In Pianura Padana each river has embankments and many of them also have (if google translate is right) rolling basin which allow water to flood specified areas (fields, not populated areas,…) otherwise it would get into towns…
    Americans…

  5. In early May, FEMA said they would give Maryland $1,044,224 for flood-mitigation efforts in Ellicott City, despite a panel specifically put together after the last flood concluded flooding could not be prevented. How many more must die? How much more do the taxpayers have to pay for this city that has flooded in varying degrees since it was created in the 1700s? Abandon the historic district!

  6. They should consider abandoning this place and moving upto somewhere safer cause this seems to happen more often now . Or find a solution like a way to turn flood waters to somewhere else .

  7. The first time my wife and I went to Ellicott City was the last time my wife and I went to Ellicott City. Avoid historic towns. They are magnets for the gullible. Prices are sky-high.

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